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MEDIA REPORTS: GRADUATION CEREMONY 2016 AT…

EngS Courses

Date: July 1st, 2014

MATHEMATICS

Courses in Applied Mathematics and Mathematics
(Minor in Math consists of 6 courses selected from the list)

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM

Mathematics 110 — Predatory and Remedial Mathematics

Course description: This gentle introduction to the mathematics necessary to succeed in a technical degree program. Little background is presumed; however, students needing to take this course should come prepared for serious work and a rapid pace.
Required topics: Functions, graphing, naive set theory, trigonometry
Optional topics: Relations and advanced set theory
Recommended text: To be announced

Mathematics 150 — Mathematics for the Engineering Sciences

Course description: This course includes the contents of a standard first year calculus course, and directly emphasizes the practical understanding of those concepts in an engineering setting.
Required topics: Basic calculus, differentiation, integration, error estimation, limitations on the accuracy of floating-point calculations
Optional topics: Introduction to proofs and proof techniques, asymptotic comparison classes
Recommended text: To be announced
Additional reading: PRESS, W.H., FLANNERY, B.P., TEUKOLSKY, S.A., AND VETTERLING, W.T. Numerical Recipes in C: The Art of Scientific Computing, 2 ed. Cambridge University Press, January 1993.

Mathematics 180 — Discrete Mathematics I

Course description: This course centers on formal proofs and mathematical theory, and prepares students for success in computer science by covering the basic mathematical content common to later courses.
Required topics: Number systems, Partial Orders, Relations, Basic Combinatory and Graph Theory, Elementary Logic and Set Theory, proofs and proof techniques
Optional topics: Number Theory, Lattices
Recommended text: ROSEN, K.H. Discrete Mathematics and its Applications, 5 ed. McGraw-Hill College Div, September 2002.

Mathematics 260 — Graph Theory

Course description: This course covers graph theory in some depth and is offered only for students preparing for graduate studies.
Required topics: To be announced
Optional topics: To be announced
recommended text: To be announced

Mathematics 280 — Discrete Mathematics II

Course description: This course covers combinatorics in some depth and is offered only for students preparing for graduate studies.
Required topics: To be announced
Optional topics: To be announced

Mathematics 310 — Logic and Foundations

Course description: This course covers Logic and Foundations in some depth and is offered only for students preparing for graduate studies.
Required topics: To be announced
Optional topics: To be announced
Recommended text: To be announced

Mathematics 310 — Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory

Course description: This course should serve two purposes—to provide an introduction to proofs and generating proofs while studying the concepts of linear algebra–vector spaces, bases and independence, linear operators, matrices etc. and to teach the student computational skills in this area needed for the engineering sciences.
Required topics: Systems of Linear Equations, Vector and Matrix Equations, Matrix
Algebra, Determinants, Vector Spaces, Independence, Linear Transformations, Eigen values and Eigenvectors, Orthogonally
Optional topics: Least Squares Problems, Symmetric tranfsormations,Quadratic forms
Recommended text: David C.Lay, Linear Algebra and its Applications
Additional reading: Marshall Ash, Linear Algebra done Right

Mathematics 320 — Real Analysis

Course description: This course is a more serious and abstract venture into some of the basic concepts of analysis seen in earlier courses as well as some brand new concepts The emphasis here is definitely on proofs and creating proofs and not on computation
Required topics: Axioms of Real Numbers, Euclidian Space Rn, Metric Spaces, Compactness,
Connectedness, Continuity, Differentiation and Integration
Optional topics: Functions of bounded variation, Outer measure, introduction to Lévesque
measure
Recommended text: Apostol, Introduction to Analysis
Additional reading: Rudin, Principles of Mathematical Analysis

Mathematics 410 — Differential Equations and Equations of Mathematical Physics

Course description: This course goes deeper into topics in differential equations and their applications. Students are familiar with some types of differential equations prior to this course, so after a quick review of familiar topics, they will continue further study of differential equations and applications in physics.
Required topics: Review: first order linear differential equations, ,Exact equations and integrating factors, Existence and uniqueness theorems, Review of second order linear equations, Variation of parameters, Solving second order linear equations with Taylor series, Higher Order linear equations (overview), The Laplace Transform and applications, Partial differential equations of first and second order, Equations of mathematical physics.
Recommended text: To be announced
Additional reading: Mariana Vukovic Diferencijalne Jednacine I, II

Mathematics 420 — Algebraic Structures

Course description: This course introduces the students to basic algebraic structures groups, rings, fields
Required topics:Groups:Axioms, properties, examples, cossets, Lagrange’s Theorem, isomorphism,
homeomorphisms, quotient groups, the Fundamental Homomorphism Theorem, Rings:
Axioms, properties, examples, integral domains and fields
Optional topics: Polynomials, Galois theory
Recommended text: To be announced

Mathematics 430 — Complex Analysis

Course description: This course covers the basic theory of functions of a complex variable and also introduces students to new integration techniques useful for applications.
Required topics: Complex Numbers, Analytic functions, Elementary functions, Integrals, Cauchy Integral Theorem, Series Expansion, Residues and poles, Applications of residues, Maximum principle, Louisville’s theorem, Open mapping theorem, Normal families, Riemann mapping theorem
Optional topics: Analytic continuation, harmonic functions
Recommended text: Brown and Churchill, Complex variables and Applications
Additional reading:Ahlfors, Complex Analysis ; Rudin, Real and Complex Analysis

Mathematics 440 — Introduction to Set Theory and Topology

Course description: This course covers some of the Foundations of Mathematics and some basic concepts of Topology. It prepares students for graduate studies and is also important for majors in computer science.
Required topics: Axioms of Set Theory, Cardinality–countable, uncountable sets, cardinal arithmetic, ordinal numbers, Topological Spaces, basis, sub-basis, metric spaces, density, countable basis, Covering– Compactness, countable compactness, Lindelof, Separation: regular, Hausdorf, continuity and homeomorphisms, connectedness.
Optional topics: Path-connectedness
Recommended text: Halmos, Naive Set Theory; Kuratowski, Introduction to Topology

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND ELETRONIC ENGINEERING

EE110 - Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering
EE 190 - Fundamentals of Electronics
EE210 – Signal Processing I
EE240 – Signal Processing II
EE 260 -Multimedia electronics

EE1 Electrical Engineering Fundamentals

Electricity; simple DC circuits; network theorems, capacitance and capacitors; electromagnetism; simple magnetic circuits; inductance in a DC-circuits; alternating voltage and current; single-phase series circuits; single-phase parallel networks; power in AC circuits; resonance in AC circuits.
Text: M. Smith, Electrical and Electronic Technology, Prentice Hall, 2002

EE2 Electronics Engineering

Electronic systems; data transmission and signals; amplifier equivalent networks; semiconductor materials; rectifiers; junction transistor amplifiers; FET amplifiers; digital systems; computer communication; industrial electronics; wireless communications.
Text: M. Smith, Electrical and Electronic Technology, Prentice Hall, 2002
J. Carr, Electronics, Newness, 2000

EE3 Power Engineering

Multiphase systems; transformers; introduction to machine theory; AC synchronous machine winding; characteristics of AC synchronous machines; induction motors; power systems; direct-current machines; direct-current motors; motor selection and efficiency and control; motor generator sets; power electronics.
Text: W. Pierre, Electrical Engineering, Ch. 15, McGraw-Hill 1999, (Mechanical Engineer’s Handbook by Baumeister)

ME4 Engineering Materials

Chemical structures; cast irons; steel; stainless steel; metals; powdered metal; alloys; corrosion of materials; plastics; elastomers; wood; adhesives; composites; ceramics; cement; materials for special requirements; lab.
Text: J. Carwell, Mechanical Engineer’s Data, Butterworth, 2001
E.N. Ganic and T. Hicks, McGraw-Hill Handbook of Essential Engineering Information and Data, McGraw-Hill, 1991

ME5 Measurements in Engineering

Measurements of length, angle, strain, temperature, pressure, velocity, fluid flow, current, voltage, resistance, power, conductivity, surface tension, surface properties; sensors; structure diagnostics; data analyses and interpretation.
Text: J.P. Hollman, Engineering Methods for Engineers, McGraw-Hill, 1988
E.N. Ganic and T. Hicks, McGraw-Hill Handbook of Essential Engineering Information and Data, McGraw-Hill, 1991

EE 07 ENGINEERING ECONOMY

ME 06 ME Project

Additional courses offered are based on “ MIT Open Course Ware “.

For more information, contact: admissions@ssst.edu.ba

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

ME1 Mechanics

Statics; friction; kinematics; dynamics; oscillation; static stress, dynamic stress, torsion; combined stresses;
Text: P.P. Benham, Mechanics of Engineering Materials, Prentice Hall, 1987
J.P. DenHartog, Mechanics, Dover 1961

ME2 Thermo-fluid Science

First and second law of thermodynamics; ideal gas; real gases; power cycles; fluid statics; fluid dynamics; boundary layer flow; flow in pipes; conduction; convection; boiling and condensation; radiation; two-phase flow; heat exchangers.
Text: W.C. Reynolds, Engineering Thermodynamics, McGraw-Hill, 1977
V.L. Streeter, Fluid Mechanics, McGraw-Hill, 1979
J.P. Holman, Heat Transfer, McGraw-Hill, 1981

ME3 Manufacturing Technologies

Machine elements and documentation; turning; drilling and reaming; milling; grinding; cutting; metal forming processes; soldering and brazing; welding; tribology; production lines.
Text: J. Carwell, Mechanical Engineer’s Data, Butterworth, 2001

ME4 Engineering Materials

Chemical structures; cast irons; steel; stainless steel; metals; powdered metal; alloys; corrosion of materials; plastics; elastomers; wood; adhesives; composites; ceramics; cement; materials for special requirements; lab.
Text: J. Carwell, Mechanical Engineer’s Data, Butterworth, 2001
E.N. Ganic and T. Hicks, McGraw-Hill Handbook of Essential Engineering Information and Data, McGraw-Hill, 1991

ME5 Measurements in Engineering

Measurements of length, angle, strain, temperature, pressure, velocity, fluid flow, current, voltage, resistance, power, conductivity, surface tension, surface properties; sensors; structure diagnostics; data analyses and interpretation.
Text: J.P. Hollman, Engineering Methods for Engineers, McGraw-Hill, 1988
E.N. Ganic and T. Hicks, McGraw-Hill Handbook of Essential Engineering Information and Data, McGraw-Hill, 1991

EE 07 ENGINEERING ECONOMY

ME7 PE Project

Additional courses offered are based on “ MIT Open Course Ware “.

For more information contact: admissions@ssst.edu.ba

PROCESS ENGINNERING

PE1 Industrial Chemistry

Stoichiometry; thermo chemistry; chemical thermodynamics relations; chemical equilibrium; phase equilibrium; solutions; chemical reactions rates; electrochemistry; organic chemistry; topics in biochemistry.
Text: R.M. Felder, Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes, Wiley, 1978

PE2 Unit Operations

Mechanical operations; fluid and particle mechanics; heat transfer operations; mass transfer operations; absorption; extraction; distillation; membrane processes; drying.
Text: W.L. McCabe, Unit Operations, McGraw-Hill, 1996
C.J. King, Separation Processes, McGraw-Hill, 1990

PE3 Chemical Processes Analysis and Design

Reaction kinetics; mass and energy balance; bath reactors; continuous reactors; fluidized bed reactor; basic principles and data for reactor design; transport and storage of reaction fluids;
Process control; chemical waste management (air pollution, waste-water and solid wastes).
Text: O. Levershpil, Chemical Reaction Engineering, Wiley, 1999

ME4 Engineering Materials

Chemical structures; cast irons; steel; stainless steel; metals; powdered metal; alloys; corrosion of materials; plastics; elastomers; wood; adhesives; composites; ceramics; cement; materials for special requirements; lab.
Text: J. Carwell, Mechanical Engineer’s Data, Butterworth, 2001
E.N. Ganic and T. Hicks, McGraw-Hill Handbook of Essential Engineering Information and Data, McGraw-Hill, 1991

ME5 Measurements in Engineering

Measurements of length, angle, strain, temperature, pressure, velocity, fluid flow, current, voltage, resistance, power, conductivity, surface tension, surface properties; sensors; structure diagnostics; data analyses and interpretation.
Text: J.P. Hollman, Engineering Methods for Engineers, McGraw-Hill, 1988
E.N. Ganic and T. Hicks, McGraw-Hill Handbook of Essential Engineering Information and Data, McGraw-Hill, 1991

EE 07 ENGINEERING ECONOMY

PE7 PE Project
Additional courses offered are based on “ MIT Open Course Ware.”

For more information contact: admissions@ssst.edu.ba

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

EE 01 ESSENTIAL BACKGROUND OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

  • Legal framework
  • Water and air environment International environmental agreements and legislations
  • Biological concepts and natural resources
  • Environmental changes and threats to the environment
  • Chemistry and Microbiology in environmental engineering
  • Concepts in hydrology

EE 02 POLUTION ENVIRONMENTS 1

  • Ecological systems, disturbances and pollution
  • Water pollution
  • Marine pollution
  • Water quality in rivers
  • Transformation processes in water bodies
  • Transport processes in water bodies

EE 03 POLUTION ENVIRONMENTS 2

  • Air pollution system
  • Atmospheric dispersion
  • Emission standards from industrial sources
  • Noise pollution
  • Noise standards, pollution and control
  • Agricultural pollution
  • Waste production on farms

EE 04 ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES 1

  • Water sources and their water quality
  • Water treatment processes
  • Wastewater treatment
  • Diffusers for wastewater
  • Anaerobic digestion and sludge treatment
  • Methane production

EE 05 ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES 2

  • Solid waste treatment
  • Sources, classification and composition of solid waste
  • Hazardous waste treatment
  • Transport of hazardous waste
  • Planning an inorganic waste treatment plant
  • Industrial air emission control
  • Agricultural Pollution control

EE 06 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGMENT

  • Waste minimization
  • Waste reduction techniques
  • Benefits of waste minimization
  • Environmental impact assessment
  • The environmental effects of roads and traffics
  • Environmental modeling
  • Case study- Plant industry

EE 07 ENGINEERING ECONOMY

EE 06 EE Project

ENERGY ENGINEERING (in development)

The center for Energy and water studies at SSST is part of this program.

Presently all courses offered are based on the model of “MIT Open Course Ware.”

For more information contact: admissions@ssst.edu.ba.